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Read, speak, sing to your baby

“Read, speak, sing to your baby: How parents can promote literacy from birth.”
A wonderful page about ways you can encourage literacy in your child from a young age.
Reward your baby’s first tries at making sounds with smiles and hugs. This early communication is exciting for your baby, and your approval will encourage him to keep trying.
Check out the page here.
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The Future Of Reading

Here is a great New York Times Article about the future of reading, and whether reading online has the same affect as reading a book does.

As teenagers’ scores on standardized reading tests have declined or stagnated, some argue that the hours spent prowling the Internet are the enemy of reading — diminishing literacy, wrecking attention spans and destroying a precious common culture that exists only through the reading of books.

But others say the Internet has created a new kind of reading, one that schools and society should not discount. The Web inspires a teenager like Nadia, who might otherwise spend most of her leisure time watching television, to read and write.

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Closing the Knowledge Gap

Here is a great New York Times article regarding the knowledge gap and the importance of talking to children before they can respond.

Trying to Close a Knowledge Gap, Word by Word

“’We don’t want parents talking at babies,’ Ms. Lerner said. ‘We want parents talking with babies.'”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/26/us/trying-to-close-a-knowledge-gap-word-by-word.html?_r=0

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Important Literacy Terms

Teach Mamma (her blog is here) has a great post on the most important literacy terms. The list includes words like comprehension, high frequency words, decoding, and phonological awareness. It’s definitely worth checking out!

The blog post is here.  There is also a simplified PDF that includes all the words and their definitions The PDF can be found here.

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Making Reading Meaningful

Project Enlightenment (found here) has partnered with the Wake County Public School System to created a great set of activities to make reading (and writing) meaningful for preschoolers.  These activities include cooking with children and letting them follow the recipe to “providing print materials such as menus, tickets, maps, and catalogues for children to use in pretend play.”

The activities can be found here.

 

http://www.projectenlightenment.wcpss.net/parent_resources/Make_Read_Write_Meaningful.pdf